Transnet announces its new and improved website, launched Jan/2003
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INTRODUCTION TO MICROARRAY
  The assessment of the expression of thousands of genes in a single experiment is now possible using DNA microarray technology. Briefly, a microarray is a small platform, such as a microscope slide or a similarly sized cassette, onto which single-stranded DNA representing as many as tens of thousands of different genes has been applied as tiny spots. Each spot of DNA does not light up (fluoresce) on its own but represents the known foundation for a unique cellular gene message. In other words, this spotted DNA serves as a target for the gene message built by the same DNA foundation from an experimental sample.
Gene messages are found in cells in the form of messenger RNA (mRNA). Thousands of different mRNAs produce the proteins required for a life form's survival and possibly its susceptibility to certain diseases. Since RNA cannot directly bind to the DNA gene it was made from (nor its specific DNA on a chip), it has to be converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) by a special enzyme called reverse transcriptase. During the reverse transcriptase procedure special fluorescent labels are added to the experimental samples. Using this procedure two cDNA samples, from two sick patients responding differently to a drug for example, are labeled with different colours and applied to the same microarray. In a special laser scanner, the label molecules light up specifically as the cDNA messages from the two patients find their spotted DNA targets. Once the scanner is finished, the colours of the thousands of DNA spots are analysed by computer. The resulting analysis provides a wealth of information about the gene messages that may be increased, decreased, equally expressed or not expressed between the two patients. This information can be used to correlate complex gene expression patterns with pathological and physiological conditions and help decipher the causes of, and the treatment of, a wide variety of diseases.

 
GENE CHIPS USED BY TRANSNET
  http://www.microarrays.ca/products/types.html
 
PROTOCOLS FOR MICROARRAY
  http://www.microarrays.ca/support/proto.html
 
ANALYSIS OF MICROARRAY DATA
  http://transnet.uhnres.utoronto.ca/docs/workflow.pdf
 
MICROARRAY PUBLICATIONS
  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

 
MICROARRAY COMPANIES
  Packard Scanarray and Quantarray
  Virteck Chipreader
  Iobion Genetraffic

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